David Barrett

Consultant Knee Surgeon

MB B.Sc. FRCS

Professor Barrett specialises in reconstructive surgery and sports injury surgery to the knee.

His surgical interests include partial knee resurfacing and total knee resurfacing. As well as complex revision surgery and problem knee cases. He has an international reputation in complex knee surgery and knee ligament reconstruction and in his role as Professor of bioengineering at Southampton university school of Engineering sciences, he has designed many aspects of different knee replacements now in use throughout the world.


Current and Recent Appointments

  • Consultant knee surgeon Southampton University Hospital NHS trust.
  • Consultant knee surgeon in private practice, Spire Hospital Southampton.
  • Consultant knee surgeon in private practice, Fortius Clinic, London.
  • Professor of Orthopaedic Engineering, School of Engineering Sciences, Southampton University UK.
     

Publications, lectures and teaching

Professor Barrett has an international reputation and travels widely in order to educate other orthopaedic surgeons in many countries throughout the world. He is a keynote speaker at many orthopaedic conferences and this year will give the keynote lectures to the Japanese Orthopaedic Society as well as the German and Dutch orthopaedic societies. He contributes to the design of knee prosthesis throughout the world and teaches both nationally and internationally.
Society Memberships

  • British Orthopaedic Association
  • European Knee Society
  • ISAKOS
  • EFORT

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Secretary's contact details

To find out more, or to arrange an appointment please contact my secretary, Aimee Dibden who will be more than happy to help:

DDI: +44 (0) 238 077 6877
Fax: +44 (0) 203 070 0106
Email: david@professordavidbarrett.co.uk

Sometimes the meniscus can be repaired using small sutures (stitches)
The knee joint consists of the lower end of the thigh bone (femur) and the top of the shin bone (tibia). At the front of the knee is the knee cap, also known as the patella. The patella moves up and down in a groove on the front of the femur as the knee bends and straightens.